Dozier Endorsed By Police Union

Atlanta, Georgia – April 12, 2017 Today, Atlanta City Council District 4 candidate Jason Dozier earned the endorsement from the International Brotherhood of Police Officers, a division of the National Association of Government Employees.

“Mr. Dozier is an established resident of Mechanicsville and has played an active role in the community. Mr. Dozier has demonstrated commitment to community and country and encompasses the dignity and dedication needed to serve the City well as a Council Member.

The I.B.P.O. is absolutely proud to endorse Jason Dozier and we look forward to working with him on City Council.”

Jason Dozier, an Atlanta native, military veteran, and local activist, proudly accepted this endorsement as a strong supporter of public safety, law enforcement, and improved police-community relations.

“I am truly thankful and truly humbled by the support from I.B.P.O. Local 623. I look forward to working with our officers to develop the community-based strategies necessary to make our neighborhoods safer. Public safety is a top priority for our campaign, and it will continue to be my priority as our next City Councilmember.”

Jason served as a reconnaissance officer in the United States Army for six years, where he earned the Bronze Star Medal and the Army Commendation Medal resulting from his service in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Jason is a proud combat veteran who remains active in several veterans groups, including the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Jason also works as a director at Hire Heroes USA, a non-profit empowering veterans and military spouses to find employment after transitioning from their time in service.

Dozier Continues to Top Fundraising Expectations

Atlanta, Georgia – April 10, 2017  Jason Dozier, an Atlanta native, Iraq and Afghanistan veteran, and community activist continues to be the top fundraiser in the highly contentious race for Atlanta City Council District 4. Dozier reported raising $51,876.04 on his March 2017 campaign financial disclosure. That is more than all of the other 11 candidates combined, including incumbent Cleta Winslow who has raised $14,248 thus far. In addition to being the top fundraiser this period, Dozier has raised more than any of Winslow’s previous competitors in her 23 years on City Council.

“This has been an extremely humbling and amazing experience,” the Mechanicsville homeowner said. “We’ve focused our campaign on core issues surrounding affordable housing, safe neighborhoods, and transparent government, and that message has clearly resonated with our supporters. We certainly look forward to engaging each and every voter across the district over the next seven months.”

Jason Dozier is an Atlanta native and lives in the Mechanicsville community with his wife, Claire. He earned his Master of Public Administration degree from the University of Georgia and currently works as a director at Hire Heroes USA, a non-profit empowering veterans and military spouses to find employment after transitioning from their time in service. Jason served in the Army as a reconnaissance officer, earning the Bronze Star Medal and the Army Commendation Medal as a result of his service overseas. In addition to his professional work with veterans, Jason serves as a community advocate in the Mechanicsville neighborhood and in Neighborhood Planning Unit V.

Dozier Becomes Top Raising Challenger for District 4

Atlanta, Georgia –  February 8, 2017  Jason Dozier, an Atlanta native, non-profit executive, Iraq and Afghanistan veteran, and community activist became the top fundraiser in the highly contentious race for Atlanta City Council District 4, a district which encompasses some of south Atlanta’s most historic neighborhoods. Dozier reported raising $36,109 in the first quarter of the race. As of the time of this press release, incumbent Cleta Winslow had not posted a report for the same period. Thus far, the closest competitor has raised only $600. In addition to being the probable top fundraiser this period, Dozier raised more than Winslow’s previous two competitors over their entire campaigns.

“We are honored by the support our Atlanta City Council campaign has received, but this is just the beginning,” the Mechanicsville activist promised. “We still have nine months of hard campaigning ahead of us. We look forward to running a positive campaign focused on the issues families and small businesses are most concerned about.”

Jason Dozier is an Atlanta native and lives in the Mechanicsville community with his wife, Claire. He earned his Master of Public Administration degree from the University of Georgia and currently works as a director at a non-profit helping veterans find employment after transitioning from military. Jason served in the Army as a reconnaissance officer in both Iraq and Afghanistan, earning the Bronze Star Medal and the Army Commendation Medal as a result. In addition to his professional work with military veterans, Jason serves as a community advocate in the Mechanicsville neighborhood and in Neighborhood Planning Unit V.

Winslow Should Denounce Corruption at City Hall

Atlanta City Council Candidate Jason Dozier Continues to Challenge Cleta Winslow to Denounce the Atlanta City Hall Corruption Scandal

Atlanta, Georgia –  February 6, 2017  Two weeks ago, Elvin R. Mitchell, Jr., a local Atlanta construction company owner, pleaded guilty to charges related to his involvement with the bribery of City of Atlanta officials intended to obtain contracts from the city. Last week, new revelations have implicated C.P. Richards Construction in this misconduct. A subpoena was issued to the owner of the company, which was the beneficiary of $10 million in payments from the City of Atlanta over five years.

This recent controversy has drawn renewed attention to ensuring that our elected representatives consistently act in the best interest of our city. The City of Atlanta still has not released records related to this scandal to the news media, and Atlanta City Councilmember Cleta Winslow has yet to issue a statement absolving herself from having any role in this wrongdoing.

Jason Dozier, a candidate for Atlanta City Council challenging Councilmember Winslow stated, “I have never taken money from Elvin Mitchell, nor have I ever had any business dealings with C.P. Richards Construction. I don’t know whether Councilmember Winslow has or has not, because she hasn’t said anything about the issue. Her silence is deafening. The people of District 4 and the City of Atlanta deserve to know where our officials stand on the matter.”

Jason’s Agenda for City Hall

“It’s time to bring a new community-based agenda to City Hall. It’s an agenda that fully addresses increasing affordable housing in our communities. It’s an agenda that focuses on making real progress in making our communities safe. It’s an agenda that ensures that our government is open and accountable again. It’s an agenda that ensures that our neighborhoods aren’t separated by highways and by railroads and all of our citizens are connected to the rest of the region. It’s an agenda that recognizes that protecting our environment is linked to protecting our homes and our health.

To often we hear “no” from City Hall. No, we won’t reveal the recipients of massive corporate welfare development deals using taxpayer money and taxpayer-owned property. No, we won’t post our spending online. No, we won’t require a Community Benefits Agreement. No, we won’t consult the NPU’s before building parking decks or making decisions about Underground Atlanta.

As our next City Councilmember I will fight to increase the number of affordable housing units in District 4. I will fight to make our communities safe again. I will fight to create the open, honest and transparent City Council our families and small businesses so richly deserve. And as our next City Councilmember I will be the strongest ally and advocate our neighborhoods have ever had on City Council.”

Lets Fix Atlanta’s Blight Problem

Atlanta has a problem with blighted and abandoned properties. Let’s fix it.

Many of us see these properties every day in our communities. They can be found near our homes, near our schools, and near our places of worship. I know exactly how frustrating it is—I live next door to a vacant lot where illegal dumping and trash buildup have proven to be a challenge to my neighbors and me.

And the problem is worse than it may seem at first glance. By simply existing, Atlanta’s vacant and blighted properties cost the city’s taxpayers between $1.6 million and $2.9 million each year in the administrative costs necessary to impose and enforce each citation.

Even worse, if you’re a homeowner and you live within 500 feet of a blighted property, then your home value drops by over 2 percent. Across the city, blight diminishes property values between $55 million and $153 million, which puts all taxpayers on the hook as this reduces the city’s revenues by as much as $2.7 million each year. This is money that could be better spent providing improved police and fire services, new sidewalks, or more efficient services at City Hall.

Furthermore, research shows that vacancy causes violent crime near foreclosed homes to increase by 15 percent and that vacant properties strongly correlate with incidences of assault. Just last summer, several dead bodies were found in vacant and abandoned homes close to Downtown. This is unacceptable.

Taxpayers take another hit because we’re ultimately helping to line the pockets of absentee property owners. These owners must only pay nominal fines (of up to $1,000) as they continue to neglect vacant and abandoned lots. And they’re largely incentivized to do so because these fines are significantly cheaper than the effort it would take to clean up the properties. For many absentee owners, this is just the cost of doing business. Yet, taxpayers must still pay for the city services necessary to address the problem. And this is worsened because many of these deadbeat owners are hiding behind shell LLCs, and there are few options for the city or county to prosecute them. That vacant lot next to my home that I mentioned before? The owner is a London-based trust with deep ties to white nationalism and neo-Nazis. This is unacceptable.

Unfortunately, the City of Atlanta is in a poor position to address these issues. The immense research necessary to correct or clarify county property documents (which could be months out of date) makes tracking down absentee owners difficult, and even impossible, in many cases. This is unacceptable.

The communities comprising southwest Atlanta are especially vulnerable to these problems. District 4 alone has the 2nd highest density of code violations in the entire city, which means everything I’ve described disproportionately affects our families, neighbors, and friends. This is unacceptable.

If elected to Atlanta City Council, I will work to reduce blight by proposing to hire the code enforcement officers and researchers necessary to improve the effectiveness of that department. I will work to significantly increase the fines for unoccupied properties with code violations, potentially resulting in criminal prosecution if violators don’t show up to court or if violations aren’t remedied. I will work with our state legislators to ensure that they sponsor legislation to provide greater flexibility for the city to use eminent domain as a remediation tool. I will work to encourage the city to ensure that vacant property condemnations expand land bank programs, which I believe are key to keeping housing in Atlanta affordable.

By addressing blight, we can get more Atlantans into homes, creating the clean, safe, and vibrant communities that our neighborhoods deserve.

Blight affects all of us, and we must act now.

We’re the people who don’t just support progressive change

We’re the people who don’t just support progressive change

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